Admitting he hasn’t done the job?

The Sandusky Register has permitted four candidates for Erie County Commissioner (two seats up for election in November) to write their own blogs about their respective candidacies. What’s your opinion of the headline for Democrat incumbent Tom Ferrell’s entry? The headline reads: “My job is not done yet.” Well, I suppose we continue to need a county commissioner, or else we’d abolish the job, right? Somehow, I think that’s not the point. I’m sure his message is that he has agenda items he’d like to tackle in an upcoming term (if voters re-elect him) that won’t be concluded by the end of the current term. But, in a Freudian slip, it reads like an admission that he just hasn’t gotten the job done, and that’s hardly a reason for re-election.

Counties in Ohio typically have 3 commissioners (Summit County is a notable exception). Though the three have equal authority to each other (OK, so they do select officers for the sake of orderliness in conducting meetings, but their votes are of equal weight), I find it interesting that one of the three in virtually any county tends to dominate the other two. In Cuyahoga County, for example, that would be Jimmy Dimora wielding more influence than Tim Hagan or Peter Lawson Jones. It often seems that the dominant one is also the most corrupt of the three. Jimmy Dimora, again, fits that model in Cuyahoga County.

In Erie County, Tom Ferrell is the one that fits the model.

Early in 2007, Tom Ferrell’s wife got a promotion within newly-elected Democrat Tom Paul’s County Auditor office. Tom Paul had to fire an employee without sufficient cause in order to create the promotion opportunity for Commissioner Ferrell’s wife. Erie County taxpayers had to shell out the bucks for Auditor Tom Paul’s bad decision when the ex-employee filed a wrongful dismissal suit. In the end, the ex-employee was vindicated, yet Tom Paul wouldn’t have done it differently, even in hindsight. Ferrell seems to have a political machine at his disposal that refuses to be intimidated–even if it’s against the rules.

Voters won’t be able to sack Auditor Paul until 2010, but they have the opportunity to vote for Republican Mike Printy as commissioner to replace Ferrell this November. I think the voters should respond to Ferrell with “Your job IS done.”

Obama Veepstakes

Any moment now, text messages may crisscross America as Obama reveals his vice presidential pick.

Who would I like to see in the Obama VP slot?

Delaware Senator Joe Biden.

Why?

Because Barack Obama could possibly win the election, and, if that were the case, I don’t want the nation to splat on the ground in the international community like a skydiver without a parachute.  It’s all about Obama’s deficiencies on the foreign policy front, which is Biden’s strongest point.  Biden would be Obama’s skydiving parachute.

McCain needs the base

Democrat pundits are almost getting giddy with speculation that McCain may choose a running mate who has “pro-choice” views on abortion, specifically referencing Tom Ridge and Joe Lieberman.  They’ve been daring, even goading, McCain to do it with teases such as “John McCain needs to show he can reach across political lines,” or “John McCain, the political maverick of 2000, wouldn’t even vote for John McCain, the strictly partisan hack of 2008.”

We’ll know the truth of the matter by the 29th of August.

But what would happen if McCain really did pick a Joe Lieberman or a Tom Ridge?  Would McCain win the middle of the political spectrum?  Maybe . . . maybe not.  He would definitely lose his hold on the base, though.  Would his base flock to Obama in that case?  No.  Would his base stay home?  A few would.  So, would letting go of his base to capture the middle help McCain win the election?  Nope.   Why?  Because those in the disaffected Republican base would probably vote for a minor party candidate.  Obama could be like Bill Clinton, who won the presidency with a minority of the vote, because minor candidates may siphon a significant number of votes away from the Republican.

How do I know that minor party candidates would enter the equation for picking the president if McCain picks Ridge or Lieberman?  Because I, myself, have cast votes for minor party candidates when my conscience wouldn’t allow me to pick a Republican in a race in which the Democrat choice was also unsatisfactory.  Been there, done that.  Let me also say that Ridge and Lieberman are liberal on more issues than just abortion.  So, let me just warn McCain not to play with fire, and pick a VP that the base can support.

My preference for the Republican VP would be: Mitt Romney.

Provenza is dangerous

Lorain’s Law Director Mark Provenza has done it again, and this time, it’s worse.  He’s an alcoholic, and he’s endangering lives.  Here’s the latest Provenza DUI story from the Plain DealerHere’s the report from Elyria’s Chronicle-TelegramHere’s the editorial from Lorain’s Morning Journal calling for Provenza’s resignation (long overdue).

I’ve long been concerned with Democrat machine politics in the city of Lorain that props up politicians who are unsuitable to hold office.  Though he’d already been charged with DUI’s in the past, Mark Provenza’s most recent re-election bid went unopposed in both the 2007 primary and the 2007 general elections.  That’s because the perception among potential rivals is that it’s futile to oppose the Democrat political machine that props Provenza up.

Provenza has always given himself a bargaining chip for potential plea deals by refusing blood-alcohol tests after law enforcement officers catch up with him, denying law enforcement from gaining access to the most convincing evidence of Provenza’s intoxication (in 2000, he got a DUI charge in Parma Heights reduced to reckless operation).  Enough of these cat-and-mouse games over Provenza’s drunken driving.  This time, it wasn’t just a matter of weaving while traveling down the road, nor was it a matter of hitting a fire hydrant.  This time Provenza crashed into a HOUSE!!!! So, not only does he not uphold the law, he’s downright dangerous.

As the city’s chief attorney, does Provenza’s repeated violations of the law make him unfit for office? Absolutely.

The voters, however, are hamstringed if they wish to replace the law director with a vote at the polls.  In order for voters to change law directors on election day, there have to be other candidates listed on the ballot, and that was not the case in 2007.  I don’t think Provenza should continue to serve out his term, but short of having a law license yanked (unlikely), about the only mechanism in place for removing Provenza from office is if Provenza, himself, resigns from it.  That’s hardly encouraging.  Just look at Detroit’s Kwame Kilpatrick, and how he continues to linger in the mayor’s office in that city.  Provenza seems to have a similar mindset, as he hasn’t stepped down in the wake of prior DUI charges.

I think it’s time that the chair of the Democrat Party in the city of Lorain, Anthony Giardini, called for Provenza’s resignation.  That would signal that the Democrat political machine no longer stands behind Provenza, which, in turn, would lead to a new candidate on the ballot in 2011 (such a long way off!), even if it turns out that there still isn’t a multi-candidate race.  It’s time to twist Provenza’s arm while leaving him with no leg to stand on.  Provenza’s got to go.

50 (57?) state strategy

I commend Barack Obama (though I don’t plan to vote for him) for contesting all 50 states (I’ll trust that Barack has figured out that he misspoke during the primary season when the number “57” escaped his lips) in the general election campaign for U.S. President this year.

In recent presidential election years, Democrats wanted to whine about how elections were stolen from them, and some Democrats even ranted that they wanted to amend the U.S. Constitution to do away with the Electoral College altogether so that they could elect a president by running up the Democrat vote totals in New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago, while ignoring hinterlands (like Ohio).  Democrats were so miffed that the election was decided by, of all things, states . . . STATES!  How irrelevant!  Why should the United States of America base its presidential elections upon the premise of winning STATES???!!!!!!

I’m glad, this year, that the Obama campaign has opted to contest all 50 states (Obama’s success at fundraising opened the door), because the media pundits, especially the Democrat pundits, have had to reference the electoral map of the U.S.A., and not just the national poll numbers.  They’ve come to grips with reality, and the reality is the Constitution, including the Constitution’s stipulations about the workings of the Electoral College.

In 2004, the John Kerry strategy for winning Ohio was to anticipate that Republicans would steal the election in Ohio, therefore an army of lawyers was recruited to catch the Republicans red-handed in the act of stealing votes at Ohio polling places.  Ludicrous (unless you happen to be Bob Fitrakis of Ohio’s Green Party).  I’m glad the Obama camp is taking a more pro-active approach toward winning the elections.

So, if Obama loses in November, can we all agree that, this time, the elections will not have been stolen?

Farewell Stephanie Tubbs Jones

A moment of silence.

Kicking and screaming (I’m back)

I love to travel.  Right after I announced that this blog would be on hiatus (brief?  OK, that turned out to be a lie), I traipsed through ten states of the USA plus a province and a territory of Canada.  I enjoyed my vacation.  I enjoyed it so much, I wanted to continue the escapism, hence the hiatus of the Buckeye RINO blog was extended so much longer than I had originally intended.

I certainly wasn’t happy about political developments prior to the hiatus.  The Marc Dann scandal, in particular, had me all bent out of shape.  Though Dann was replaced in the Ohio AG office in short order,  there was a lingering distaste that made me think about ignoring politics.

Being the person I am, though, I really can’t ignore politics.  All I could really do was procrastinate resuming my blog about politics.  In that sense, I felt like Jonah, of the Old Testament, who tried to dodge his responsibility to warn Ninevah.  He had to face up to his duty eventually, and I’ve had to extricate myself from the whale I’d been swallowed up in and sound the clarion call at Buckeye RINO.

So many new political developments have occurred during my absence that I found it daunting (overwhelming is probably the more appropriate term) to update my blog.  So perhaps I won’t try to update everything.  Perhaps, to make the task less daunting, I’ll just begin with where things stand right now and write as though someone pinch-hit for me during my absence, keeping everyone up to date.

So, I’ve dragged myself back to the computer keyboard (kicking and screaming the whole way) to resume my ramblings at this blog.  Sorry for the delays.  Thanks for your patience.